C++ Workshop Documents


C++ Workshop Template Code

http://pastebin.com/bWMhZzi2

I think there are several reasons to get at least passingly familiar with C++ even if you plan to use higher level languages as your tool of choice. Here are a few:

It's like learning Latin to understand English better. A lot of languages were modeled on the syntax and constructs, for example C#, Java, JavaScript, etc. Picking up C++ or at least C will give you a head start by teaching you the common denominator between all those languages.

Understanding the things that are abstracted away from you in other languages (pointers, basic data structures, garbage collection) theoretically makes you a better programmer even if you don't directly tinker in the details.

It doesn't happen every day, but one day you are going to need to connect directly to a C++ program API from your high level language. It will help if you have at least a passable knowledge of C++ when this happens.

C++ on your resume can often lead to Salary++. It is just respected as more of a hardcore language.

I often see C++ used as a common language between programmers who work in different languages, and in programming books that are trying to be language agnostic (Code Complete). Knowing C++ opens access to a lot more learning material.

RESOURCES:

http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_41_0/libs/libraries.htm

http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_40_0/

(Better for beginners)

http://www.learncpp.com/

(The best online reference for c and c++)

http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/

(Standard C++ Library reference)

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/125580/what-are-the-advantages-of-using-the-c-boost-libraries

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/4682355/use-boost-c-libraries